November is American Diabetes Month

 

Tanaka Shipp, our Diabetes Program Coordinator shares. . .

Diabetes and the Flu

Today, an estimated 29 million people are living with diabetes in the United States. Most people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Excess weight, particularly in the abdomen, makes it difficult for cells to respond to insulin, resulting in high blood glucose. Often, people with type 2 diabetes are able to lower their blood glucose by losing weight and increasing physical activity. Losing weight also helps lower the risk for other health problems that especially affect people with diabetes, such as cardiovascular disease.

Thanks to better treatments, people with diabetes are now living longer—and with a better quality of life—than ever before. If you are living with diabetes, it’s important to make choices that keep you and your loved ones healthy.

Protect Yourself from Influenza (The Flu)

Information for People with Diabetes (either type 1 OR type 2) and Their Caregivers

If you have diabetes, you are three times more likely to be hospitalized from the   flu and its complications than other people. The flu may also interfere with your blood glucose levels.

  • But there are steps you can take to protect yourself.
  • Get a flu shot! It’s the single best way to protect yourself against the flu.
  • Take prescription flu medicine when your health care provider prescribes it.
  • Follow special sick day rules for people with diabetes.
  • Take everyday steps to protect your health.

People with diabetes should talk with their health care provider now to discuss preventing and treating the flu. People infected with the flu can pass it on to others a day or two before any symptoms appear. That’s why it is important to make sure the people around you get a flu shot as well.

A Flu Shot is the Single Best Way to Protect Yourself Against the Flu

The vaccine is safe and effective. It has been given safely to hundreds of millions of people. You should get the flu shot vaccine and not the nasal spray type of vaccine.

Everyone ages 6 months and older should get the flu shot unless told otherwise by a health care provider, especially people with diabetes. The flu shot is given with a needle, usually in the arm. The vaccine used in the shot is made from killed virus. You cannot get the flu from the flu shot. A few people may be sore or notice some redness or swelling where the shot was given or have a mild fever. For more information about possible reactions, go to http://www.cdc.gov.

Pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended for people with diabetes. One possible complication of flu can be pneumonia. A pneumonia (pneumococcal) vaccine should also be part of a diabetes management plan. Talk to your health care provider for more information on getting both vaccines.

Register for a Diabetes Self-Management Class Today!

Above all, cherish your health and Live Well with Diabetes!  Click here for information on Diabetes Self-Management classes hosted by the Center for African American Health in your neighborhood. Contact Tanaka, tshipp@caahealth.org or (303) 355-3423 extension 108, to register for a class or set up a class (for 10 or more people) at your site.

Register today for the upcoming 6-week class at:

TREA No. 3 (The Retired Enlisted Association)
Thursdays, November 13 - January 8, 2015
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
1599 Dayton St.
Aurora, CO 80010
(there will be no class held on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's holiday)

 

 

EVENTS

Annual Report 2013
To receive a copy of the Center for African American Health 2013 Annual Report, visit us at 3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Denver, CO 80205 on the Clayton Campus at Colorado Blvd.
Faith and Health Ministry Save the Date December 11, 2014

13th Annual Health Fair is February 28, 2015

Events, Classes & Workshops  
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